The Oracle

IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

Back to Article
Back to Article

IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

Julia Cheunkarndee, Features Editor

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Written by Julia Cheunkarndee

As one of the West Coast’s favorite burger chains, In-N-Out’s brand is easily recognizable: an angled yellow arrow and red graphics of swaying palm trees beyond calm ocean waves. Less well-known, however, is In-N-Out’s unique history, which is a tale contrary to that of most fast food chains.

In 1948, Harry Snyder founded In-N-Out with his wife Esther in a Los Angeles suburb. He was inspired by the short and straightforward menu of a steakhouse restaurant near his home and wanted to use the same simplistic methods for his own burger joint. Burger lovers who frequent In-N-Out can probably vouch for the impact of Snyder’s dream; the chain is famous for its minimalistic menu, with only three types of burgers—the hamburger, cheeseburger and double double—as well as fries and three flavors of milkshakes.

Snyder’s style of running a fast food chain contrasts sharply with traditional methods. While chains frequently update their menu over the years, In-N-Out’s has not changed since its establishment, providing the same options to its customers now as it did seventy years ago. However, customers in-the-know may have heard of In-N-Out’s “secret menu,” which has items that vary from the chain’s original menu and range from animal fries (which are cooked with mustard and come topped with cheese and grilled onions) to the protein-style burger (which is a beef patty wrapped in lettuce instead of buns).

In-N-Out also promotes its use of only fresh ingredients rather than frozen products that most fast food restaurants buy to cut their costs and production time. Slices of fries are crispy cut from potatoes, the burger patties are made from fresh beef and milkshakes use real dairy products. The same care goes into In-N-Out’s treatment of its employees, who are paid more than the usual fast food rate and have the lowest employee turnover rate in the industry.

In-N-Out remains in the Snyders’ ownership with CEO Lynsi Snyder, who is Harry and Esther’s granddaughter, at the helm. The couple’s small burger joint in Los Angeles has expanded to 334 restaurants in six states. The growing popularity of In-N-Out can be attributed to the heart and care that is put into the food—a standard of quality that customers can taste.

Leave a Comment

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Left
  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    Four books to cuddle up with

  • Lifestyle

    Teen Party Culture can Introduce Students to Alcohol at a Young Age

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    Juice cleanses do more harm than good

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    Artists Should Not Take Political Stances

  • Lifestyle

    Political stances taken by artists over the years

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    The Gunn Bucket List: all the things you should do before graduation

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    Skiers pursue powdery passions: William O’Donnell

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    Skiers pursue powdery passions: Patrick Gersh

  • IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings

    Lifestyle

    Seniors demystify second semester senior year

Navigate Right
The Student News Site of Henry M. Gunn High School
IN-N-OUT finds success after humble beginnings